Category Archives: Editors Extra

What we read this summer

Usually summer reading lists appear at the start of the season, but this year we asked EFC staff (The Evangelical Fellowship of Canada is the publisher of Faith Today), what they have already read this summer. So far. In no particular order, here is what we’ve been reading these past six weeks or so.

The Pilgrim’s Progress, John Bunyan
Does Jesus Really Love Me? A Gay Christian’s Pilgrimage in Search of God in America, Jeff Chu
Gender Roles and the People of God: Rethinking What We Were Taught About Men and Women in the Church, Alice Mathews
The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel Series, Michael Scott
(re)union: The Good News of Jesus for Seekers, Saints and Sinners,  Bruxy Cavey
Jesus and Nonviolence: a Third Way,  Walter Wink
A Call to Mercy: Hearts to Love, Hands to Serve,  by Mother Teresa, editor Brian Kolodiejchuck
Essentialism: The Disciplined Pursuit of Less, by Greg McKeown
The Narnia Chronicles, by C.S. Lewis
Jubilee, by Margaret Walker
My Promised Land: the Triumph and Tragedy of Israel,  by Ari Shavit
Love Giving Well: the Pilgrimage of Philanthropy, by Mark Petersen
Planted, by Leah Kostomo
The Art of Memoir, by Mary Karr
War, by Sebastian Junger
The Year of Magical Thinking, by Joan Didion
This is the Story of a Happy Marriage, by Ann Patchett

And of course, we are all reading Faith Today. If you  haven’t subscribed yet, do it today so you won’t miss a single story. Do you know about our risk-free trial subscription offer?

 

The passing of a great one: Haddon Robinson influenced many Canadian preachers

Years ago, I sat in a small room at the old campus of Tyndale University College & Seminary in Toronto and interviewed Haddon Robinson, who died last week. The scholar most recently from Gordon Conwell Seminary, known far and wide as one of the greatest living preachers, was in Toronto to speak at Tyndale’s President’s Dinner. I had already met Haddon because my husband was enrolled in a DMin program, with  Haddon as his supervisor. The one moment I remember clearly from the interview was Haddon growling, in his distinctive New York accent, that when he reads theology that is dense and incomprehensible, he just wants to “throw it against the wall.” That’s because he was a master of communication, and that’s what he expected from his students.

Like many, many Canadian preachers and church leaders over the years, Brent made a yearly trek to Boston to study under one of the greats. I would hazard to guess that this unassuming American preacher from a hardscrabble childhood influenced more Canadian preachers over the years than one could easily count. The Canadians in the program tended to drift toward each other, and that was no different in my husband’s group. Toronto church planter and writer Darryl Dash became a friend. I asked him, on behalf of the Canadian preachers who studied under Haddon, to share some thoughts.

Here’s Darryl:

I first met Haddon when I was assigned the task of driving him back to the airport in Toronto. His full name: Haddon Robinson, author of Biblical Preaching, renowned professor of preaching, named one of “The 12 Most Effective Preachers in the English-Speaking World” by Baylor University.
Continue reading The passing of a great one: Haddon Robinson influenced many Canadian preachers

Celebrate with us! Awards for Faith Today

Hooray for the Faith Today writers and staff who were publicly recognized this week!

Faith Today contributors won nine awards June 22 from the Canadian Church Press, an association of about 60 magazines and newspapers. Two of the awards were for first place:

  • layout and design of a single issue. Take a minute to admire the complete winning issue by designer Janice Van Eck
  • personal experience article. Have you read Mark A. Buchanan’s For the Love of the Church?

 

Then on June 23 came more awards from The Word Guild, a national association of several hundred Christians in publishing and communications.

  • Allison Barron’s Faith Today article on Trinity Western University and the legal battles around its proposed law school won a first place for short feature.
  • The founder of Faith Today, Brian Stiller, received the Leslie K. Tarr career award, as well as a second award for his book An Insider’s Guide to Praying for the World (Bethany House/Baker Publishing).
  • Although we can’t take credit for it, Faith Today’s senior writer Patricia Paddey also won an award for her book with Dr. Jean Chamberlain called The Game Changers: True Stories About Saving Mothers and Babies in East Africa (Save the Mothers).

 

And those awards are just the tip of the iceberg. We’ll post links to the second and third place winners below, but first we need to thank all our subscribers and supporters.

Your help make Faith Today‘s ministry possible. You encourage us to aim for excellence in our service to Christ and His church in Canada.

We welcome your continued support through prayer and email. You can help ensure our financial health by buying a subscription for yourself or someone you love or by making a charitable donation.

Please join the broader Canadian Christian publishing community in expressing well deserved appreciation to all the writers, editors, designers and publishers who work (often in the background) to build the Kingdom in these ways.

Complete lists are now available online of this year’s CCP awards and TWG awards, all for materials published in 2016.

My morning on Ottawa’s streets. The start of a Faith Today story

When we first moved to Ottawa in January, a brand new city for us,  we didn’t know much of anything about living in the area. A fun group of parishioners from our new church who live in the same neighbourhood as we do had a get-together to welcome us and answer questions. They filled scrapbook pages with tips on things like where to get the best thai food and cupcakes (those ‘must-know’ bits of information).

Later, on the “Day Trip” page, I  noticed one woman had written, “Shadow me on the sidewalks of downtown Ottawa and minister to the poor.” And she doodled a smiley face in blue marker beside her invitation.

Last Thursday, I took her up on it. We met at our downtown church at 7:30am and fuelled ourselves with coffee and breakfast at a nearby diner, where I heard her heart for this ministry of presence on the streets of the nation’s capital. Then we wandered the sidewalks to reach out to the homeless we came upon. My friend Jill is executive director with  Urban Christian Outreach Ottawa. She spends usually two days a week doing what we did last week, prayerfully walking down the sidewalks of downtown Ottawa, trying to be salt and light to those who need her.

We ducked into a courtroom to see if any of Jill’s friends were there. We wandered through a mall where many of them used to hang out to see if anyone needed her there. We stopped and spoke to men (because it was just men on that day), who were panhandling and offered to get them water or coffee. In one case, Jill bought breakfast for a veteran who was sitting in a wheelchair, cup out for donations.

We sat in McDonald’s, while Jill tried to help one of the men we met that day.

The story he told us was sad and complicated, and hinted at the maze like process veterans have to navigate, sometimes alone, to get the help they may need. In the end, our friend wheeled away from us in frustration, assuming we were just another dead end. Undaunted, Jill pulled out her phone to make calls to see if she could still find out anything that would help the man find a home.
Continue reading My morning on Ottawa’s streets. The start of a Faith Today story

Off you go to the printers! See you soon.

Today we hit ‘send’ on the latest issue of Faith Today, shooting it out of our computers directly to the printers’, almost right on schedule. The last few days of a magazine’s production cycle involve poring over pages and pdfs, tweaking design (although our designer is so good we rarely do any tweaking) and trying to pick up any last stray errors or omissions. And then finally saying, “Done!”

Here it is! A sneak peek at our Jul/Aug issue. We’d love it to be your first issue as a Faith Today subscriber.

In about two weeks we will have the glossy, deliciously real magazine in our hands, ready for distributing, reading, flipping, sharing with friends, and fanning out on coffee tables (or this time of year, maybe straight to the cottage?).

We know you will enjoy this “birthday issue” of Faith Today. Not our birthday of course, but Canada’s. When we began to sketch out the issue we knew we wanted a kind-of aerial view piece on the evangelical Church in Canada. Where have we come from? What are our milestones, even as our country celebrates a biggie? And, perhaps most intriguingly, where are we headed? This one story, by veteran writer and intrepid-challenger-of-the-status-quo, John G. Stackhouse Jr., takes the lion’s share of space in this issue, as it should. But it is balanced beautifully with an essay by Mark Buchanan, a writer whom we think is one of Canada’s best. He’s been thinking about King David a lot lately, and what David can teach us about friendship.

We met up with Christine MacMillan at a conference recently in Ottawa. She is a leader in the Church in Canada who is now on the global stage with the World Evangelical Alliance. She’s been in the pages of Faith Today before, but not as the lead interview. We’re so glad she sat down with us and opened up about what she is seeing going on in the evangelical Church worldwide, but also about her own recent journey with cancer, something she refers to as the “cross of the unexpected.”
Continue reading Off you go to the printers! See you soon.

Reconciliation involves listening. Blanket Exercise makes that easy.

I participated in my first Blanket Exercise recently on Parliament Hill.

The largest Blanket Exercise in Canada was held recently on Parliament Hill

I had heard of it only once before, when the earnest son of a friend, newly sensitized to Aboriginal issues, tried to walk his extended family through it at a barbecue, to mixed results. I knew it involved blankets and a history lesson, and in my friend’s case, an annoyed grandpa.

But it was much more than that.

Kairos Canada, who helps facilitate the exercise, describes it as a “participatory popular education methodology” with the goal of  building “understanding about our shared history as Indigenous and non-Indigenous peoples in Canada by walking through pre-contact, treaty-making, colonization and resistance.” If you show up, you can be involved. The colourful blankets, in my case spread out beneath the stairs that lead up to the front doors of Parliament, represent pre-colonized Canada.

You’re invited to take your place on the blankets, and there it begins, a moving and enlightening walk-through of Canada’s history with our First Nations.

What struck me most, besides of course the realization of how much I don’t actually know  (or have forgotten) about my country’s own history, was the kindness of the facilitators. Volunteers strolled through the crowd offering kleenex to those moved to tears by the experience. Then, in a move that reminded me of Psalm 56:8 (God gathering our tears in a bottle), they collected the tissues back up again, because the tears were so important and not to be carelessly tossed aside.

Participants were warned they might find the exercise upsetting, learning in more detail than perhaps ever before about the harsh and sometimes fatal treatment of Indigenous peoples by the hand of government, Church, and history in general. But we were very kindly and gently asked to not feel shame or guilt, but to enter and exit the exercise with a healthy sense of hope and love for each other. It was about reconciliation. That beautiful spirit touched me as much as the actual shifting and sorting and bunching up of blankets that told this part of our history that we’d probably rather forget. But true reconciliation means remembering.

Next week, on Wednesday June 21, it is Aboriginal Day. If you can find some event in your community — maybe even a Blanket Exercise — to show your commitment to reconciliation and hope and love, try to attend.

Here at Faith Today, our Jul/Aug issue features an interview with Christine MacMillan, World Evangelical Alliance’s associate secretary general for public engagement. Here’s part of what she said about reconciliation in that soon to be published interview: “It’s being patient. It’s listening to the point where listening even of itself be- comes peace and reconciliation. It’s exploring “what will it take to bring peace?” – and as you explore in that way reconciliation starts to happen. The process is as important as the outcome. [Reconciliation doesn’t begin] until you get people feeling the trust in the room that allows them to tell the layers of their story. The Church must be that safe place, as well as that public place.”

Thanks for reading our blog! If you’d like to try out the magazine, let us know.

 

 

Talk about pornography with your kids, you might be surprised what you hear

A few of us have taken home a copy of the EFC’s latest resource, “Battling Pornography: A Guide for Canadians.” The booklet is a collection of resources about the prevalence of online pornography, how it harms, and how we can help.

This is by no means a comprehensive survey, but so far 100% of our sons — when gently approached with the topic, booklet in hand, by their slightly embarrassed mothers — have immediately acknowledged that online pornography is an open and shameless secret among their peers. It’s almost a given. Another story from the trenches involves a husband, whose co-workers refuse to believe he doesn’t view pornography.

Here’s another way you can use these booklets. Scatter them on a table at your church. These particular ones were spotted at St. Peter and St. Paul’s Anglican church in downtown Ottawa.

Forty-nine percent of Canadians think pornography is “morally acceptable,” according to one of the stats in the booklet. Our chat over coffee at the EFC Ottawa office would suggest that number is probably a lot higher, or certainly will be in a few years when all these teenage boys reach adulthood. And they won’t reach adulthood unscarred by their exposure to online porn. Another colourful spread in the booklet graphically depicts “The brain on pornography.” It’s certainly colourful, but not a pretty picture. Pornography use is addictive and will distort how viewers understand sex, gender equality and change forever their own threshold for pleasure.

“Battling Pornography: A Guide for Canadians” is not meant to scare you (although it might). It’s meant to get the conversation going, in your homes and churches, just like it’s doing in ours. So, have us send you one or a few. Then make a cup of tea and sit down with your family.

Download a free copy of this resource, or if you’d like copies for your home and church, call us. 1-866-302-3362.

If you are faith-based group sponsoring refugees, you are doing them a great service

Privately-sponsored refugees are more likely than government-sponsored refugees to have Canadian friends for the long haul. That was one of the insights presented about immigration and refugees at the “Our Whole Society: Religion and Citizenship at Canada’s 150th” conference, held recently in Ottawa.

If you are part of a faith group sponsoring refugees, this will ring true for you, as private sponsors are normally very involved, at least in the beginning months, of a newcomer’s settlement experience into Canada. Driving someone to the dentist, going grocery shopping with them and helping their kids adjust to a new school are all potential ingredients for a life-long bond. Plus, you care.

“Faith and Settlement Partnership: Setting Immigrants and Canada Up for Success” was the name of one workshop offered at the conference. A panel presented some of the initial findings of a multi-partner research project (of the same name as the workshop) going on now in Canada by the Centre for Community-Based Research.

The research is tackling three main questions:

  • To what extent are faith/settlement partnerships viewed positively?
  • What types of partnerships presently exist and how could they be improved?
  • How can effective partnerships be better facilitated?

Initial results show that faith groups tend to work better with short term focused projects. They are very effective at mobilizing for immediate action. Sometimes faith groups give out inaccurate information to newcomers, and settlement agencies have to clear things up when needed.

The research is showing that there needs to be more collaboration between government and faith groups, in order for faith groups to be more integrated in the world of sponsoring refugees in Canada, and for the sake of the refugee. Trust is key. A recurring theme to the research into partnerships between faith based groups and settlement agencies was the need to be friends, and nurture that relationship. And collaboration is key to responding to service gaps. Faith based services and organizations should be part of the settlement supports offered newcomers, suggest the research. Faith helps people overcome challenges and find meaning in difficulties. Faith is significant for the integration of newcomers, so clergy and faith based groups can and should be part of the settlement process. Settlement brings a lot of stressors, faith can be used to mitigate many of them.

The researchers feel there is energy and excitement around the prospect of a closer partnership. And incase you wondered, Mississauga, Ont.,  is the third most attractive city (after Montreal and Toronto) for recent immigrants born in Syria.

And, not surprisingly, less bureaucratic red tape would help everyone.

Karen Stiller is a senior editor of Faith Today. Read about the experience of some churches settling refugees in Canada for the first time. Subscribe today

Fear of parents is a factor in abortions

Last week the March for Life wound its way through downtown Ottawa. Thousands of people filled the streets carrying pro-life signs and banners. As I thought about the issue of the day, I couldn’t help but reflect on the two situations involving abortions I have been closely involved with in my life.

One was a friend years and years ago, when we were barely out of our teens, the other was more recently with another young woman. In both situations, but particularly the most recent one now that I’ve had children of my own and know more about the issue, I worked hard to try to present alternatives to abortion. Ultimately, I failed. I arranged a meeting between the young woman and a crisis pregnancy centre worker in my living room. I met with her myself whenever she’d let me, trying to listen and to gently persuade her to walk the path of courage and sacrifice and yes, what seemed to her to be the more difficult path, — and not have the abortion.

In the end, though, she did.
Continue reading Fear of parents is a factor in abortions

Gary Chapman on the history of The 5 Love Languages

By Gary Chapman

I have always liked wildflowers.  There is something exciting about scattering seed and waiting and watching to see what comes up.  However, through the years I have sometimes been disappointed when few seeds germinate.  My friend George, who has a “green thumb” told me, “It’s the soil.”  With a question mark in my eyes, I said, “I thought wildflowers grew every-where.”  “They do,” he replied, “but some flourish in one soil, but struggle in another.  It’s the soil,” he repeated.

As a marriage counselor, I discovered that the same principle is true in marriage.  Take love, for example.  I’ve seen husbands expend great energy and often lots of money to show their wives how much they love her.  Then, they step back to see their “love seeds” grow and produce a smile.  However, the wife doesn’t give any evidence that a seed has been planted.  The problem?  It’s the soil.

One wife considers flowers a huge expression of love, while another wife says, “Why did you spend money on flowers?  They will be dead in three days.”  Or, a wife may spend hours cleaning the house and is disappointed when her husband doesn’t even notice.  She was expecting accolades, but all she received was silence.

The reality is that what makes one person feel loved does not make another person feel loved.  We tend to think, “If I see it as an act of love, they will receive it as an act of love.”  That is a false assumption.  This explains why so many spouses are disappointed when they plant seeds of love that never germinate.
Continue reading Gary Chapman on the history of The 5 Love Languages