Why is Christian Art Sometimes So Schmaltzy?

Change of Season by Patty Kingsley
Change of Season by Patty Kingsley

My kids have a lovely relative who buys them Christian novels to read. Lately, I’ve noticed a growing skepticism on the part of my children. They are suspicious of the book if they think it is “Christian.”

At 18, 15 and 14, they have – without any help from me I will add – concluded that sometimes those books just aren’t as good as the ones you read at school or even more likely, pick up at Indigo.

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Canadian Churches and Armageddon

– By Gordon Heath

It was a war that was not supposed to happen. Growing tensions in Europe were obvious, but recent developments in international arbitration had fuelled hopes that differences between imperial powers could be resolved peacefully.

A hundred years ago, Canadians entered the summer with little inkling of the utter disaster looming just over the horizon, and were unprepared when they found themselves at war on August 4, 1914. Armageddon had arrived.

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Why I am Pro-Life

Photo by Christine Reid

I am firmly pro-life. My opposition to abortion is not based on a careful study of the issue, although it may have begun that way. My position on abortion has been cemented by my family experience.

My wife became pregnant just a couple of months after we were married. We were very excited about the baby and we began to purchase clothes almost immediately. Not long after, we noticed the bleeding. A trip to the hospital brought the dreaded words from the doctor, “It looks like you are having a miscarriage.” As we were leaving the hospital, one of the nurses said to us, “There you go, good as new.” No we were not as good as new. We were grieving deeply. It was not just a disappointment of being delayed in growing our family. We were grieving because our child had died. We had even named our child, even though we did not know the gender. It is hard for me to understand how some parents could choose to experience something that was so devastating to us.

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Lunch With the Pope

– By Brian Stiller

The inevitable question I’m asked when somebody hears I’ve been with the pope is, “What’s he like?” Here are some personal observations from a recent visit.

Impressions in the first moments so frame how we see an individual. This, my second meeting with Pope Francis, an almost three-hour conversation and lunch, allowed me to more carefully form impressions.

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5 Reasons Why You Should Bother With History

By Kevin Flatt

My life is saturated with history. I teach it every fall and winter term at Redeemer University College, in the form of courses on everything from the development of Western Civilization to the totalitarian regimes of the twentieth century. I carry out historical research and publish the results in books and academic articles. I write the History Lesson column for Faith Today.

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Writing the Walking Wounded

Lieutenant-Colonel Chris Linford

My assignment to write the Walking Wounded, the Faith Today story about soldiers with post traumatic stress disorder and how churches can help, was one of those journeys into the unknown.

All I knew about the topic was the headlines in the paper telling of what seemed to be a rash of soldier suicides in Canada. It seemed unbearably sad and unfair that those who served our country in awful situations overseas and survived would come home only to take their own life in private agony.

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A Church of Many Colours

– By Alex Newman

100_0284I have a “thing” about Ann Voskamp. It’s called envy. Not only of her significant writing ability, but her stillness and openness to the Holy Spirit as well. We are polar opposites – me impatient and easily irritated versus her life on the farm which is in the moment as she meditates over the laundry basket.

Too willing to give in to anxiety – juggling schedules and worrying about things beyond my control – I forget those sparrows and lilies (Matthew 6:25). Not that Voskamp spends her entire day in contemplative prayer – with six children and a farm to oversee with her husband she has more than enough to do – but her writing has that quality which indicates a nature that is calm at its core. This is what’s thoroughly and utterly beyond me.

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Tools for Thinking

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When the Canadian Bible Engagement Study was released, we brainstormed how we could help Faith Today readers make sense of the data.

The report is a troubling examination of how much – or how little – Canadians use the Bible. Even most of us who identify as Christians rarely read it!

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What We’ll Be Reading This Summer

Faith Today asked a variety of Canadian Christian leaders about what they hope to read over the more relaxed summer season. Read on for the initial responses! 

Feel free to share your own reading recommendations with us by email or on our Facebook page, and we’ll add them in a future post. You may also want to check out recommendations from last summer.

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Awards Remind Us What We’ve Got

CCPaward2013
What do awards like this one mean?

Many Canadians seem to enjoy reading Faith Today, but what’s it really worth?

Say you open your mailbox and see two new magazines, Faith Today and something else, is it hard to choose which to read first?

Of course those of us who write and edit and lay out the articles are aiming for the highest quality. We believe we’re doing what God is calling us to do. But what if nobody else thought so? That’s where objective reader feedback – and Holy Spirit feedback – are so important. Let me explain.

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