Tag Archives: Christian journalism

Off you go to the printers! See you soon.

Today we hit ‘send’ on the latest issue of Faith Today, shooting it out of our computers directly to the printers’, almost right on schedule. The last few days of a magazine’s production cycle involve poring over pages and pdfs, tweaking design (although our designer is so good we rarely do any tweaking) and trying to pick up any last stray errors or omissions. And then finally saying, “Done!”

Here it is! A sneak peek at our Jul/Aug issue. We’d love it to be your first issue as a Faith Today subscriber.

In about two weeks we will have the glossy, deliciously real magazine in our hands, ready for distributing, reading, flipping, sharing with friends, and fanning out on coffee tables (or this time of year, maybe straight to the cottage?).

We know you will enjoy this “birthday issue” of Faith Today. Not our birthday of course, but Canada’s. When we began to sketch out the issue we knew we wanted a kind-of aerial view piece on the evangelical Church in Canada. Where have we come from? What are our milestones, even as our country celebrates a biggie? And, perhaps most intriguingly, where are we headed? This one story, by veteran writer and intrepid-challenger-of-the-status-quo, John G. Stackhouse Jr., takes the lion’s share of space in this issue, as it should. But it is balanced beautifully with an essay by Mark Buchanan, a writer whom we think is one of Canada’s best. He’s been thinking about King David a lot lately, and what David can teach us about friendship.

We met up with Christine MacMillan at a conference recently in Ottawa. She is a leader in the Church in Canada who is now on the global stage with the World Evangelical Alliance. She’s been in the pages of Faith Today before, but not as the lead interview. We’re so glad she sat down with us and opened up about what she is seeing going on in the evangelical Church worldwide, but also about her own recent journey with cancer, something she refers to as the “cross of the unexpected.”
Continue reading Off you go to the printers! See you soon.

The Top Faith Today Blogs of 2016

Blog readers, we salute you. Thank you for paying attention and interacting with the Faith Today blog. Our intention with the blog is to provide you with even more excellent Christian journalism and thinking, to build on and expand on what you find in the pages of the print magazine. As we begin a new year of blogging, here’s a look back on the Top 10 Faith Today blog posts of 2016. 

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  1. Announcing a Faith Today contest to reward your pastor. This blog post invited Canadian congregations to nominate their pastors for a well-deserved break. Canadians loved this idea, because they love their pastors.
  2. Pornography most common sexual sin of men. We invited Kirk Giles, head of Promise Keepers Canada, to write for us after he appeared in the magazine as our featured Question and Answer subject. His topic was provocative and timely.
  3. Goodbye beautiful writer, our lovely friend. We said goodbye to Debra Fieguth, a beloved and highly experienced Canadian Christian journalist this year. The Christian writing and reading community celebrated her achievements while mourning her loss.
  4. Memories of the Christian Brethren. Faith Today readers enjoy John Stackhouse’s great writing and challenging insights. He offered us some warm memories in this more personal piece than we usually see from him.
  5. What I learned visiting churches in Moncton. Sometimes our ideas for blogs come from outside of our writing circles, and we love that. This one hit a nerve.
  6. The 17 year old girl forced to go to church shares her thoughts. Wow! This one really caused some waves. This blog from 2015 still made our 2016 Top Ten list. A 17-year-old daughter of one our editors tells it like it is.
  7. We know it will be messy: Trinity Western. Readers responded well to this behind the scenes look at the motivation behind Trinity Western University’s long, long struggle to have their law school students recognized across Canada.
  8. Writing the difficult story of Gospel for Asia. In this blog we explained more about our reasons for writing an investigative piece into one of the world’s largest Christian charities. Some of our readers had wondered if we were in the muck a bit with this one — we think not, and here we explained why.
  9. Faith Today writer shares what it’s like to have a sister in the Olympics. Sometimes a blog is just fun, light, wonderful reading, like this one.
  10. Dear Fundraiser, a letter from Christians who give. Our cover story writer on “Being, Doing, Having” (all about Christians and money) does a spin-off blog on fundraising, and readers enjoyed it.

Thanks again for reading the Faith Today blog. Subscribe to the print issue today and keep Christian print journalism alive and well in Canada.

A Christian Journalist Ponders Response to Jian Ghomeshi Case

By Patricia Paddey

It’s been sadly fascinating to follow the news about the very public firing of a certain Canadian media personality. Patricia Paddey

The more I read, the worse I felt. But I couldn’t put down the bag of potato chips until I felt truly nauseous.

This was an interviewer I admired, and his was a show I enjoyed. As a Christian journalist I have learned and been inspired from his skill.  I appreciated his velvet voice, his way with his guests, the scope of his subjects and the obvious depth of research that went into each and every interview. So I read his Facebook confession, and several hundred of the responses from fans that followed.

And as I glimpsed a virtual outpouring of support for the man in the wake of his revelations, I felt disturbed, heartbroken. I had the sense I don’t belong – in this country – in the 21st century – any more.

Our society seems to have moved to the point where – for many people – character no longer matters. I’m not talking about unproven allegations. I’m talking about what the man publicly admitted in his Facebook post. Because, yes, the quality of a person’s character encompasses what they do in secret, and the degradation of another human being should never be called good.

Bondage, domination, sadomasochism – these things ought never to be normalized as if they were just alternate expressions of healthy sexuality.

But based on the outrage expressed over this man’s firing, and the calls for his reinstatement, they are things that no longer shock or disturb us. The real crime today is to judge such behaviour.

The former radio host claims all of his bedroom activities with young women were consensual. He insists that made them all right.

According to a report in The Globe and Mail, the Supreme Court of Canada “has said a person cannot consent to an assault that causes them bodily harm.”

But Christians believe human beings are more than bodies. Our souls, our spirits are mysteriously and beautifully interrelated with our bodies and are a part of what make us uniquely human.

Degrading sexual acts not only degrade bodies, but souls as well. Not all bruises are visible. Why would we – as a society – sanction something that derives pleasure from causing such harm?

Patricia Paddey is a senior writer at Faith Today.