Tag Archives: Patricia Paddey

Seven great reasons to grab hold of the May/Jun Faith Today

Hey folks! We are excited, as always, about the next issue of Faith Today. And we think you will be too. Here are seven great things coming up, and seven great reasons to subscribe today

(1) “Help Your Kids Embrace the Faith: Trading in picture-perfect faith for authentic experience with Jesus” is our cover essay from Rebecca Gregoire Lindenbach of Ottawa. She is the author of the upcoming book Why I Didn’t Rebel: A Twenty-Two-Year-Old Explains Why She Stayed on the Straight and Narrow—and How Your Kids Can Too (Thomas Nelson, 2017).

Faith Today is Canada’s Christian magazine. Subscribe today.

(2) “Voyeurism, Exploitation or Edgy Fiction? The mixed messages of Pure” looks at the new CBC TV series about a Mennonite mafia.

(3) The Five Love Languages turns 25: Our mini-interview with Gary Chapman. Is your love language words of affirmation? Quality time? Receiving gifts, acts of service or physical touch? It’s been 25 years since the release of Gary Chapman’s enormously best-selling book The Five Love Languages. Chapman had several Canadian speaking engagements this year to mark the milestone. He spoke with Faith Today about the book, its legacy and the new challenge to modern marriages.

(4) “How to Lead Well When Leading Is Hard: Agents of Change in a Resistant Culture” is an essay by Gary Nelson, president of Tyndale University College & Seminary.

(5) “The Shack Controversy: How the Label ‘Christian’ Can Lead Us All Astray” is a feature article by senior writer Patricia Paddey, addressing the new movie based on a controversial bestselling novel by Canadian born “missionary kid” William Paul Young.

(6) “Listening to the diaspora church: A conversation in Toronto leads to insights and knowledge about immigrants and the Church.” Staff from the Tyndale Intercultural Ministry Centre share what we all need to hear from a recent gathering of nine immigrant church planters at The People’s Church in Toronto.

(7) An investigative piece by Craig Macartney into why and how Compassion International was forced out of India after 48 years in that country. Compassion centres ran out of money because the government banned them from receiving any foreign funds—cutting off support for 145,000 children and their families. The move is part of a growing wave of nationalism that is spurring a sharp increase of Christian persecution.

Plus challenging columns by John G. Stackhouse, Jr., James A. Beverley, Carolyn Arends and Bruce Clemenger. Each issue of Faith Today now comes with a new copy of Love Is Moving, the EFC’s magazine for young adults. Subscribers are encouraged to enjoy it themselves or to give their copy to a young person you know and love.

Our favourite Faith Today stories in 2016

As a fun end-of-year exercise, we editors put our heads together and chose some of our favourite Faith Today stories from 2016. “Favourite” meaning they resonated with readers for some reason. Or favourite could mean that we just simply loved the end results of the writer’s hard work, or thought an interview subject said some really important things we all need to hear.

We started out the year with a love letter to the Church. See you in 2017!

So, here’s our list (in no particular order, and just for fun).

Artful Discipleship: how the arts can help in spiritual formation. We love this Carolyn Arends piece with the honour it gives to the arts, and of course, with its connection to our first ever, wildly popular colour it yourself Faith Today cover. This was so much fun to pull together and it was awesome to see readers respond and send in coloured covers from all across Canada.
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A Christian Journalist Ponders Response to Jian Ghomeshi Case

By Patricia Paddey

It’s been sadly fascinating to follow the news about the very public firing of a certain Canadian media personality. Patricia Paddey

The more I read, the worse I felt. But I couldn’t put down the bag of potato chips until I felt truly nauseous.

This was an interviewer I admired, and his was a show I enjoyed. As a Christian journalist I have learned and been inspired from his skill.  I appreciated his velvet voice, his way with his guests, the scope of his subjects and the obvious depth of research that went into each and every interview. So I read his Facebook confession, and several hundred of the responses from fans that followed.

And as I glimpsed a virtual outpouring of support for the man in the wake of his revelations, I felt disturbed, heartbroken. I had the sense I don’t belong – in this country – in the 21st century – any more.

Our society seems to have moved to the point where – for many people – character no longer matters. I’m not talking about unproven allegations. I’m talking about what the man publicly admitted in his Facebook post. Because, yes, the quality of a person’s character encompasses what they do in secret, and the degradation of another human being should never be called good.

Bondage, domination, sadomasochism – these things ought never to be normalized as if they were just alternate expressions of healthy sexuality.

But based on the outrage expressed over this man’s firing, and the calls for his reinstatement, they are things that no longer shock or disturb us. The real crime today is to judge such behaviour.

The former radio host claims all of his bedroom activities with young women were consensual. He insists that made them all right.

According to a report in The Globe and Mail, the Supreme Court of Canada “has said a person cannot consent to an assault that causes them bodily harm.”

But Christians believe human beings are more than bodies. Our souls, our spirits are mysteriously and beautifully interrelated with our bodies and are a part of what make us uniquely human.

Degrading sexual acts not only degrade bodies, but souls as well. Not all bruises are visible. Why would we – as a society – sanction something that derives pleasure from causing such harm?

Patricia Paddey is a senior writer at Faith Today.

Reasons to Read the Bible Well

-By Patricia Paddey

When Faith Today asked me to submit something for this space related to “How to Read the Bible Well,” I said yes. And then I considered backing out.

The more I thought about what to write, the more I reckoned maybe I’d already said all I had to say on the subject. Part of that feeling is no doubt rooted in insecurity.

I’m no expert on reading the Bible well. I’ve read it almost my entire life, but somehow, I tell myself, if I’d been reading it well all those years, my life would be in better shape by now. I’d be some sort of super Christian today. My faith would be stronger, more resilient. My service would be more energetic and fruitful. My sins and failures would be fewer and farther between.

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When Life is a Monument

– By Patricia Paddey

Reg Petersen, Bridgeway Foundation
Click on the picture to read the original article in Faith Today.

When I was still a young woman in my early 20s, I heard a pastor say in a sermon that, “every person is a monument to the decisions and choices they have made.” That little piece of wisdom must have struck me as particularly profound because I scribbled it down on one of the blank pages at the front of my Bible. I’ll bet I read those words thousands of times over all the years I had that Bible; it would not be an exaggeration to say they helped shape my life.

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